Mountain Cycling - Recent Questions, Troubleshooting & Support


tighten the center bolt of the head stock that holds the handle bars

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Sep 18, 2018


loosen rear tire pull back and tighten when chain slack is removed

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Jul 09, 2018


Google (sumer)(18)(manual) without parens OR request directly from Sumer.

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Jun 30, 2018


Not that important except for selling the bike, but if you really need to know then Google "Trek serial number" or "Trek 8000". Not possible to ID with just serial number. For more info see my T How to determine the year value etc of your bicycle

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/donald_f2ed37026a3ac881

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Apr 24, 2018


Not clear yet - enter your question into Google for details

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/donald_f2ed37026a3ac881

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Mar 01, 2018


The brand is on the head badge (on the part of the frame where the fork goes through to the handlebars). If that is missing, and there is no model name on the frame then it will be very difficult to ID brand. Please note that removal of the head badge may indicate the bike has been stolen, or that the bike has been repainted - often poorly. You don't need to know brand to work on it or to get parts..

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/donald_f2ed37026a3ac881

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Feb 21, 2018


Not a problem that can be diagnosed without eyes and hands on the bike. Post a clear video, or better - take to a bike shop or bike co-op.

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/donald_f2ed37026a3ac881

Mountain Shimano... | Answered on Jun 12, 2017


have no real idea what it is . google search shows many things even a pontoon inflatable boat . the wheel hubs could be wore out

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Jan 28, 2017


I don't know the name of the part, and it's going to be very difficult to ID the part over the Internet. That is a bike that sells for under $100, and therefore unusual OEM parts would be very hard to find. Take to a bike shop to see if they can suggest a fix.
NOTE: The bikes are distributed by Dynacraft, which has been the subject of suits and settlements due to serious fork and frame problems. Dynacraft BSC Inc

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/donald_f2ed37026a3ac881

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Dec 07, 2016


What rim you need has too many variables (width of tire to be used, your weight, balance of road/off-road usage and roughness of off-road use, budget, etc.) that you have not mentioned for anyone to give an appropriate recommendation.

Secondly, unless the rims are both bent it's a waste of money and effort to replace them, as good quality rims and spokes alone (a new rim may need different length spokes) could cost almost as much as the original cost of the bike ($119), let alone when you add labor.

Finally, worrying about "ultra light" rims, especially on a bike that weighs 35+ lbs, is useless. Shaving off ounces when the bike and rider together could weigh 200 lbs. is not going to make it faster or easier to pedal.

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/donald_f2ed37026a3ac881

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Sep 28, 2016


There are a number of different designs of crank and detachable pedals and some that have been forged in one or two pieces and so the procedure will vary depending on the design of yours.

I suggest you search on youtube for a helpful how-to video.

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Aug 30, 2016


it is the circumference of the wheel in millimeters. You can measure this yourself as each wheel can vary slightly depending upon the tire used, air pressure, tread wear, and rider weight. You can use the "roll out" method: put the valve in the six o'clock position, roll the bike forward in a straight line until the valve is back to the six o'clock position and measure the length between the two points. If you measure in inches you can multiply by 2.54 to get centimeters or 25.4 to get millimeters. For more detailed instruction read Sheldon Brown's great webpage on the subject here: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cyclecomputer-calibration.html

Mountain Cycling | Answered on Apr 18, 2016

Not finding what you are looking for?
Mountain Logo

155 questions posted

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Mountain Cycling Experts

Marvin
Marvin

Level 3 Expert

83843 Answers

Lawrence Oravetz

Level 3 Expert

10484 Answers

Vernon Taylor

Level 3 Expert

5135 Answers

Are you a Mountain Cycling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...